Types of MS

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The majority of patients (85 percent) begin with a relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS). With this type, individuals experience symptom flare-ups (also referred to as “exacerbations” or “relapses”), lasting from a few days to a few months. Corresponding flare-ups of inflammation and lesion formation may be viewed on an MRI. These are followed by a complete or partial remission, which for many, can last for months or years.

This remission can be deceptive, however, because of the clinically silent aspect of MS. Lesion flare-ups and inflammation within the CNS (Central Nervous System) occur at least 10 times as often as clinical attacks. Without the benefit of an MRI, patients and medical professionals can only identify outward symptoms and clinical attacks, and are not aware of the degree of disease progression within the CNS.

Without treatment, many people with RRMS will eventually advance to secondary-progressive MS (SPMS). They may either experience relapses with less recovery, or have no relapses at all. Primary-progressive MS (PPMS) patients (10 percent of the MS population), have fluctuations of symptoms, but no documented relapses. Progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS) patients (less than 5 percent of the MS population), experience progression from the beginning, but also have superimposed relapses. Progression indicates a gradual course of nerve degeneration, with less involvement of inflammation in the disease process.

Please contact me with any questions at 1-208-773-9372, cell phone 1-208-818-2150 or my e mail beth.wobbles@gmail.com